"La Plus Long Phrase Du Marcel Proust" T-Shirt for Men / Unisex

"La Plus Long Phrase Du Marcel Proust" T-Shirt for Men / Unisex

24.90

Wear the longest phrase in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time on the back of this exclusive T-shirt.

The t-shirt features the full phrase in its original version in french: 823 words, no stops.

DETAILS:

  • Organic V-Neck T-shirt
  • Single Jersey
  • 100% Organic ring-spun Combed Cotton
  • 155 gsm

🔗 Size Guide

Size:
Quantity:
Add To Cart

Seven volumes. In Search of Lost Time is one of the most ambitious works of world literature. As with “Ulysses,” Proust's work is discussed in inverse proportion to his reading. To the extent that in France, when someone asks you what you are reading, you can ironically reply: "I am immersed in the re-reading of Proust." At the heart of this answer lie both the magnitude of “La Recherche” and, at the same time, the need to read it. Meanwhile, the anecdote of Proust's madeleine is another interesting example of how a work of such magnitude has reached popular imaginary.

La Plus Longue Phrase Dans A La Recherche Du Temps Perdu

The length of the book is not only quantitative, but, as it is often studied and endlessly discussed, the work reaches such levels of syntactic and lexical complexity and sophistication that it could be defined as sui generis. Although it is difficult, almost impossible, to determine exactly what is the longest sentence in the seven volumes, it would seem the winning answer is a phrase containing 823 words without a full stop or a line break. In this sentence, contained in the fourth volume, Sodom and Gomorrah, Proust ponders on homosexuality and the systematic persecution that Power inflicts upon individuals, just because they are different. It appears that the text is born from Proust's reflections on the trial of Oscar Wilde, arbitrarily accused of “sodomy and pederasty” as a consequence of his claim to the right to dissent and individual freedom. Wilde was sentenced to two years of forced labor. Proust' s friendship with Wilde and the sympathy of the French author with his situation will, as a result, yield one of the most spectacular and beautiful phrases ever written.